Why is The Lottery dystopian?

Is The Lottery dystopian or utopian?

The short stories, Harrison Bergeron, and The Lottery, are both literary examples imparted around a utopian society. Harrison Bergeron, was written by Kurt Vonnegut in 1961. This story elucidates a dystopian society that is derived of its individuality and is expected to conform to authorities.

Is The Lottery a dystopian short story?

In the short story “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, dehumanization is a result of society’s pressuring of the masses into practicing old traditions. … The dystopian idea of dehumanization is present in this quotation because it shows how citizens are forced into participating against their own will.

Who is the dystopian hero in The Lottery?

“The Lottery” begins without a clearly defined protagonist and focuses on the seemingly quaint traditions of the small town instead of one central character. However, as the story culminates, Tessie Hutchinson emerges as an unlikely protagonist as she cheerfully shows up to the lottery proceedings late.

What type of society is in The Lottery?

The villagers of “The Lottery” live in an intensely patriarchal society. The anonymity of the village lends the story a sense of universality.

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What does a dystopian society look like?

Characteristics of a Dystopian Society

Information, independent thought, and freedom are restricted. A figurehead or concept is worshipped by the citizens of the society. Citizens are perceived to be under constant surveillance. Citizens have a fear of the outside world.

Why Shirley Jackson wrote The Lottery?

Shirley Jackson’s purpose in writing “The Lottery” was to show ordinary people in small-town America committing an evil act without any malevolent motive, or even any motive at all. … Jackson gives a plausible account of how such events might have occurred.

What is the main message of The Lottery?

The primary message of Shirley Jackson’s celebrated short story “The Lottery” concerns the dangers of blindly following traditions. In the story, the entire community gathers in the town square to participate in the annual lottery.

What happens to the winner of The Lottery The Lottery?

By Shirley Jackson Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

What kind of dystopia is the lottery?

In a dystopia, citizens live in a dehumanized state, conform to uniform expectations, and worship a figurehead. It’s these traits that make Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery depict a dystopian society.

Why is Tessie the antagonist in the lottery?

But, because of this tradition and the town’s belief that this tradition must continue, Tessie ends up dying in the end; therefore, making her the protagonist and tradition the antagonist. In “The Lottery” the antagonist may be difficult to identify because it is not a character or person in the story.

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